This is a slightly dated post (written around November last year), that I forgot to post some time ago, so bare in mind, we’ve already started working on the faceted navigation getting open source status and I’ve updated the first sentece to include Adam Matusiak joining our team – Welcome Adam!

LocutusBorgQueen Over the last month or two  our hive mind has assimilated two new voices, our thoughts have become one with Greg’s, and Adam’s.

But seriously, the EPiServer (and consequently the .Net) part is getting really strong with eight nine(!) developers on that side currently working on a number of projects and that’s just developers!

What I really like is that we’re not just consuming the APIs, we already have developed some very cool technologies and the best part is that we’re starting to look seriously at open-sourcing some of our technologies to make the EPiServer community benefit from our experience. As a part of Cognifide Labs (that we hope to evolve in shape of Google’s “Pet projects”, I’m really looking forward to that). I’ll be working in my spare time on making our page commenting engine as well as our faceted navigation engine public consumption ready and ultimately add to the EPiCode experience. These are some modules that we’ve been working on for a long time, but just so busy with the various project development we’ve never been able to make them commented and documented enough for it to be a viable for a 3rd party developers to grasp. But already the technologies proven to be robust, scalable and extensible to support sites with over 6 million page views per month and growing and the site being fast and responsive just like you were the only person visiting it, thanks to using our data caching/fetching routines. All of that despite of a number of content pages counted in tens of thousands now.

It’s good to be a part of the hive mind, especially as brilliant as this one, so give in …resistance is futile, you will be assimilated!

Would you be interested in working with us on the technologies? How much need do you have for an elaborate faceted navigation in your projects? Did you have a need to add a commenting (site wide) to a site that already works, in a way that is not intrusive and that allows you to moderate comments in with the EPiServer editing mode integration? Which one would you find more interesting for us to start working on making public?

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This entry (Permalink) was posted on Wednesday, January 23rd, 2008 at 1:36 pm and is filed under .Net Framework, EPiCode, EPiServer, Software Development, Web applications. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response , or trackback from your own site.



  • Can we see some examples of the faceted navigation feature before we decide :-) Screenshots?

  • Hey Steve,

    Both the faceted navigation and the page comments are available on http://www.setantasports.com

    The facets that you see in the url pretty much drive the whole site and the navigation on the left hand side column is an appliances for selecting and adding facets to the context.

    You may experiment with adding facets to the url and see how the content changes e.g. if you open the main page and add a “/football” or “/golf” at the end or anywhere after “facets/” you will see the same page but serving content from a different context. In this case everything that’s tagged with “football” facet. Basically an ultra fast category search.

    The faceted engine also features properties for tagging pages, and referencing both multiple and single facets.

    I’ll be adding more documentation to the blog shortly the engine is indeed a platform for very fast retrieving and providing a tagged content, including facilities for parsing and constructing faceted url with FriendlyUrl and without the module.

    Also a part of the module is our “content accelerator” module for quick retrieval of objects stored as pages and for determining whether a user has an access to a page. So far the navigation is written in a “visitor mode” mostly so there is little facility for users at a various privilege level, but that’s what was working for us so far. the navigation also features the elimination of duplicate links on a page through controls (of various priority/value) participating in a bidding for content and getting the data provided to them through events. This is really a bit hard to explain in a short comment. I’ll try to document it better in a series of articles I’ll be writing on the blog to document our work.